Watch “Bárðarbunga volcano – livestream” on YouTube

Bárðarbunga volcano – livestream :

This post will be a sticky with updates added below with the newest information at the top. Unless otherwise stated all quotes are from the Icelandic Met Office. If the video above is not working live cams can be viewed at;

http://www.livefromiceland.is/webcams/bardarbunga/
http://www.livefromiceland.is/webcams/bardarbunga-2/

Note : Shaking on the camera is most likely due to strong winds .

Updates are below

15th October
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The morning report first, the ironic bit is in boldface.

As reported yesterday, there is an increase in the number of detected earthquakes in the Bárðarbunga area. Calm weather recently, resulting in better detection of small earthquakes, is hardly enough to explain this increase anymore and probably this increase is real. During the last 24 hours, almost 130 earthquakes have been detected at Bárðabunga and about 30 in the northern part of the dike. No quakes above 5 in magnitude have been detected since 12 October, but five quakes yesterday were between 4.5 and 4.8.
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The eruption was clearly visible on webcams from midnight until almost 8 o‘clock this morning

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– During last week the eruption continues at a similar intensity and with similar lava flow. 
– Around 130 earthquakes have been measured in Bardarbunga over the last 24 hours, which is an increase of what has been the norm over the last two weeks. 
– The GPS station in the centre of Bardarbunga is back on-line. The subsidence of the caldera continues with similar rate as before, which is 30-40 cm per day.
– The subsidence is mainly in the northeast part of the caldera. The subsidence of the caldera is estimated to be 0,75 km3. 
– 13 earthquakes greater than M3.0 were recorded over the last 48 hours in or around the caldera. The largest one were M4.8 at 18:51 yesterday. 
– Little seismic activity is now detected in the northern part of the dyke and around the eruption site. 
– GPS measurements show minor movements. No great changes were detected. 
– No change was detected in water monitoring that cannot be explained by changing weather.
en.vedur.is
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29th September
Bárðarbunguskjálftarnir 16/08-23/09 2014: http://youtube.com/watch?v=7s9LIiQ2vXI
An M5.5 earthquake was recorded this afternoon.

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Notes from the Scientific Advisory Board

– The new lava field in Holuhraun was 44 square kilometres on last Saturday and still continues to grow. There are no signs of the eruption being in decline.
– The subsidence of the Bardarbunga caldera continues with slightly slower rate and is now around 40 cm pr. 24 hours. 
– Seismic activity in Bardarbunga continues on similar rate as the last few days. Six earthquakes bigger then M3,0 were recorded since noon yesterday. The biggest one was M5,2 at 12:34 yesterday. 
– Smaller earthquakes were detected in north part of the dyke and around the eruption site. 
– GPS measurements show continuing slow movements. 
– No change was detected in water monitoring that cannot be explained with changing weather.

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Air quality:

Today (Monday) gas pollution from the volcanic eruption is expected towards northwest of eruption site. Tomorrow (Tuesday) the pollution will affect areas to the north and northeast. A map showing the gas forecast can be found on the web page of the Icelandic Met Office http://www.vedur.is/vedur/spar/textaspar/oskufok/ An interactive map showing the gas distribution can be seen at http://www.vedur.is/vedur/spar/gasdreifing

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http://en.vedur.is/earthquakes-and-volcanism/articles/nr/2947
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23rd September
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Earthquakes since 16th August, accessed 24th September (as per timestamp). Preliminary analysed data by the SIL seismic monitoring group of the Icelandic Meteorological Office

23 September 2014 19:30 – from geoscientist on duty

No changes in seismicity observed in the afternoon. Ten events of M>=3 have been manually checked since midnight. Three of these have M>=4:
at 07:57 Mlw 4.0
at 13:44 Mlw 4.4
at 04:33 Mlw 5.2 all in northern Bárðarbunga.

Between 50 and 60 events have been manually located in Bárðarbunga since midnight and similar number in the dyke. For Bárðarbunga this is similar compared to the average of last three days.

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17th September

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Measurements show that the lava field in Holuhraun continues to expand. There are no signs of decreasing lava production.

The subsidence of the Bardarbunga caldera continues with the rate of about 50 cm over the last 24 hours. 

Seismic activity has been rather intensive over the last 24 hours. Yesterday 7 earthquakes larger then M3,0 were detected in Bardarbunga. The biggest were M5,4 and M4,8 last night. Smaller earthquakes were detected in Dyngjujokull glacier and in north part of the dyke. 

GPS monitoring show irregularity in in the crustal movements over the last few days. This sign could indicate that the magma movement under Bardarbunga is changing.

No change has been detected in water measurement

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14th September 2014
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There is still much speculation and fear regarding the ongoing fissure eruption of Bardarbunga in Iceland – that is apart from other volcanoes showing signs of waking

http://volcanocafe.wordpress.com/2014/09/13/rapid-inflation-at-grimsvotn/

Currently it looks like activity from the fissures is easing, however large M5+ earthquakes are still occurring inside the subsiding caldera so magma is still arriving into the system.
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http://en.vedur.is/earthquakes-and-volcanism/earthquakes/

The Icelandic Met Office see three scenarios as most likely at this point in time

Subsidence of the Bárðarbunga caldera stops and the eruption on Holuhraun declines gradually.

Large-scale subsidence of the caldera occurs, prolonging or strengthening the eruption on Holuhraun. In this situation, it is likely that the eruptive fissure would lengthen southwards under Dyngjujökull, resulting in a jökulhlaup and an ash-producing eruption. It is also possible that eruptive fissures could develop in another location under the glacier.

Large-scale subsidence of the caldera occurs, causing an eruption at the edge of the caldera. Such an eruption would melt large quantities of ice, leading to a major jökulhlaup, accompanied by ashfall.

Much depends on if or where a further eruption occurs and if that will affect Northwest Europe or even the hemispheric weather pattern. With two of the three most likely scenarios involving an explosive eruption, it bears watching closely.

This is the latest published view of the current situation from the Scientific Advisory Board of the Icelandic Civil Protection:

The eruptive activity at Holuhraun continues at similar intensity. The lava flows at slower rates than it did yesterday. The lava is now spreading more to the sides and there is less visible activity is in the eruptive craters.

The subsidence of the Bárðarbunga caldera continues and is now up to 23 meters.

Scientists flying over the area saw new tongues of lava breaking out from the main lava stream towards the east and west. The largest one of these lava tongues stretches towards the east and had become 300 m wide and 2 km long at 18:00 yesterday. An eruption cloud reaches 4 km in height but lowers with distance from the eruption site.

Seismic activity is similar to what it has been in the past days but earthquakes are starting to go down in numbers and magnitude. Over 60 earthquakes have been detected since midnight. Most of them have been by Bárðarbunga and the dyke under Dyngjujökull. The biggest earthquake, of magnitude 4.0, was detected today at around 07:00 in the south of Bárðarbunga. [Note an M5.3 earthquake, shown in the from IMO image above, occurred at 1406 today after this report had been released] Three other earthquakes of 3.0 in magnitude or more have been detected today.

GPS monitoring shows continuing subsidence in Bárðarbunga and insignificant crustal movements north of Vatnajökull around the dyke.

Air quality in urban areas in the East of Iceland:

High air pollution was detected yesterday in Egilsstaðir and Reyðarfjörður. Forecasts indicate that the gas cloud will blow towards the north in the next 24 hours. High concentrations of sulphuric gases can be expected in Mývatnss

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Image: Icelandic Met Office
Lava Extent as of 11th September 2014
Image: Icelandic Met Office

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11 September 2014 11:45 – from the Scientific Advisory Board

Scientists from the Icelandic Met Office and the Institute of Earth Sciences and representatives of the Civil Protection in Iceland attend the meetings of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Icelandic Civil Protection. Representative from The Environment Agency of Iceland and the Chief Epidemiologist and the Directorate of Health, were also present.

Conclusions of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Icelandic Civil Protection:

The eruptive activity at Holuhraun continues at similar intensity. Lava flows at similar rates as yesterday. The lava is flowing towards East but widens slightly towards North. The main flow follows the river bed of Jökulsá á Fjöllum. No explosive activity due to the lava and river water interaction has been observed, but steam rises from the lava.

Air quality in urban areas in the East of Iceland:

  • Forecasts indicate that high concentrations of sulphuric gases may be expected in the northern part of the Eastern fjords, Fljótsdalur, Hérað, Jökuldalur, and Vopnafjörður. High concentrations could occur in other areas as well. People who feel discomfort are advised to stay indoors, close the windows and turn off air conditioning.  Measurements of air quality can be found on the webpage loftgaedi.is. The Meteorological Office issues warnings if conditions change to the worse.
  • Instructions from the office of the Chief Epidemiologist and The Environmental Agency can be found on their web-sites.

Air quality at the eruption site:

  • Gas emissions at the eruption site remain high. As local gas concentrations at the site can be life threatening, people at the eruption site should wear gas masks and gas meters. At the eruption site, local wind anomalies can occur due to thermal convection from the hot lava. This makes the conditions on site extremely dangerous as winds can change suddenly and unpredictably.
  • Earthquake activity in the caldera of Bárðarbunga remains similar to that of the last days. Epicenters are distributed along the northern and south-eastern caldera fault. An earthquake of M 5.3 occurred at 00:07 h. Earthquake activity at the dyke tip has decreased. More than 30 events have been detected since midnight. Low frequency tremor is similar to what has been observed in the last few days.
  • GPS observations show insignificant crustal movements supporting the assumption that the amount of magma flowing into the dyke continues to be similar to the magma erupted to the surface. Considering the time period since the beginning of the eruption slight movements towards the Bárðarbunga caldera indicate continuing subsidence of the caldera.

Three scenarios are considered most likely:

  • Subsidence of the Bárðarbunga caldera stops and the eruption on Holuhraun declines gradually.
  • Large-scale subsidence of the caldera occurs, prolonging or strengthening the eruption on Holuhraun. In this situation, it is likely that the eruptive fissure would lengthen southwards under Dyngjujökull, resulting in a jökulhlaup and an ash-producing eruption. It is also possible that eruptive fissures could develop in another location under the glacier.
  • Large-scale subsidence of the caldera occurs, causing an eruption at the edge of the caldera. Such an eruption would melt large quantities of ice, leading to a major jökulhlaup.

Other scenarios cannot be excluded.

1st September

– At 20:00 UTC yesterday, the lava extended over a 3-km-area. This corresponds to a magma discharge of 300 to 500 cubic metres per second. From observations yesterday evening, the volume of erupted lava is between 16 and 25 million cubic metres.

– The eruption has not created any ash-fall.

– Gas and steam rises to a couple of hundred metres above the eruption site, extending up to 1,200 m downwind.

– In connection with the FUTUREVOLC project, a gas monitoring station has been set-up near to the eruption site. Gas measurements indicate a high level of sulphur dioxide. People could be exposed to highly dangerous gas levels close to the eruption. It is essential that those visiting the eruption site are equipped with gas sensors and gas masks.

– According to the latest GPS observations, horizontal ground movements continue in response to the dyke intrusion. There is no clear sign of a pressure decrease in the dyke intrusion in connection with the ongoing eruption, although there are irregularities in GPS displacements at nearby stations. The northern extent of the dyke intrusion has not changed to any great extent.

– When Sunday’s eruption began earthquake activity decreased somewhat, although seismicity remains high, with over 500 earthquakes detected since midnight today. Most of the seismicity is occurring on the northern end of the dyke intrusion, covering a 15-km-long region that extends partly beneath Dyngjujökull and north of the ice margin.

– At 08:58 UTC today, a magnitude 5.0 earthquake was recorded on the Bárðarbunga caldera, and another of magnitude 5.2 at 11:41 UTC in the same region.

– It remains unclear how the situation will develop. Four scenarios are still considered most likely:

The migration of magma could stop, resulting in a gradual reduction in seismic activity and no further eruptions.

– The dike could reach the Earth’s surface causing another eruption, possibly on a new fissure. Lava flow and (or) explosive activity cannot be excluded.

– The intrusion reaches the surface and another eruption occurs where either the fissure is partly or entirely beneath Dyngjujökull. This would most likely produce a flood in Jökulsá á Fjöllum and perhaps explosive, ash-producing activity.

– An eruption in Bárðarbunga. The eruption could cause an outburst flood and possibly an explosive, ash-producing activity. In the event of a subglacial eruption, it is most likely that flooding would affect Jökulsá á Fjöllum. However it is not possible to exclude the following flood paths: Skjálfandafljót, Kaldakvísl, Skaftá and Grímsvötn.

Other scenarios cannot be excluded.

http://en.vedur.is/earthquakes-and-volcanism/articles/nr/2947
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the eruption continues

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and it’s reported that

lava has been building up and are moving tens of meters per second…although the eruption is now in a fissure, about 1.5 to 2.0 kilometers long, tomorrow morning one or two craters might have formed.

http://Icelandreview.com/news/2014/09/01/eruption-tomorrow-morning-there-might-be-craters

31st August
The latest fissure eruption appears to be subsiding but an M5.1 quake* was recorded just after 1201 and is therefore not in the latest update from the Icelandic Met Office (copied below). A further M4.9 followed at 1612.

* the larger M5+ quakes, sometimes two separated by a few hours, seem to appear every ~18-28 hours and are if I recall correctly (IIRC) mostly in Bárðarbunga caldera. The time between these events appears to be stretching out.

31st August 2014 12:07 – from the Scientific Advisory Board

Scientists from the Icelandic Met Office and the Institute of Earth Sciences and representatives of the Civil Protection in Iceland attend the meetings of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Icelandic Civil Protection.

Conclusions of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Icelandic Civil Protection:

– A lava eruption started in Holuhraun shortly after 04 AM, on the same volcanic fissure, which erupted earlier this week. The fissure is estimated to be 1,5 km long. It was detected on Míla´s web-camera at 05:51 AM. Fewer earthquakes seem to follow the event than in the previous eruption, but more lava is being extruded.

– At 07 AM the lava flow was around 1 km wide and 3 km long towards northeast. The thickness was estimated a few meters, the flow about 1000 m3 pr second.

– Approximately 500 earthquakes were detected in the area and smaller than before. The strongest earthquake, M3.8 was in the Bárðarbunga caldera. Poor weather conditions prevail in the area, which makes detection of smaller earthquakes difficult.

– GPS measurements show continued movements north of Dyngjujökull.

– Gas emissions rise to a few hundred meters above the fissure.

– Weather conditions make it difficult to follow the progression of the eruption, but scientists are in the area, using every opportunity to acquire information on gas and lava outflow.

– Weather conditions do not allow overflight at this time. The opportunity to fly over the area will be assessed later today.

From the Icelandic Met Office:

The Aviation Colour Code for Bárðarbunga is at ‘red’ and the code for Askja at ‘yellow’.

http://en.vedur.is/earthquakes-and-volcanism/articles/nr/2947

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2 thoughts on “Watch “Bárðarbunga volcano – livestream” on YouTube

  1. There is a relation between tide times and big earthquakes occurring in Bardarbunga. You must search times separately for coastal stations and specific locations. You should read my posts under the tag GLOBAL ISSUES.
    Best regards.

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