Today We Had A Heavy And Destructive Thunderstorm in Northern Germany

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A highly relatable personal account of Tuesday’s events in Germany as the storm system passed over Northern Europe.

It continued to blow hard here today with some nasty squalls in between. It’s an odd sight to find branches and leaves on the ground in early May. The spectra of light greens not deep reds and yellows told me that it was Spring not Autumn.

To the author I would say yes it is ‘climate change’ but it has nothing to do with mankind. What we are experiencing in Northern Europe is something not often experienced but is just a sign our planet and its weather are once again changing as it always has done and always will. At 33 you have been lucky to have lived in a fairly benign warm climate period that is showing signs of reverting once again.

Brian Fagan has some wonderful books which open the eyes to what our ancestors faced
A modern day European transported to the heights of the [Little Ice Age] would not find the climate very different even if winters were sometimes colder than today and summers very warm on occasion too. There was never a monolithic deep freeze rather a climatic see saw that swung constantly back and forwards in volatile and sometimes disastrous shifts. There were arctic winters, blazing summers, serious droughts, torrential rain years, often bountiful harvests and long periods of mild winters and warm summers. Cycles of excessive cold and unusual rainfall could last a decade a few years or just a single season. The pendulum of climate change rarely paused for more than a generation.”

Tornadoes in the 11th and 19th Centuries. –  http://www.torro.org.uk/site/whirlwind_info.php

The 16th Century was also stormy –
http://notalotofpeopleknowthat.wordpress.com/2014/02/06/storminess-of-the-little-ice-age/

However we don’t have to go back centuries for examples of unusual weather
http://denisdutton.com/newsweek_coolingworld.pdf

🙂

Diary of Dennis

We had real heavy storm in Northern Germany today. I thought the storm was heavy in our federal state Schleswig-Holstein but then I saw the news about the neighboring federal state Mecklenburg-Vorpommern, there was total destruction in some towns. We had more luck in Schleswig-Holstein, but it was very unusual and scary anyway. They said in the news that it was a tropical thunderstorm.

I was sitting in my living room and watched out of the windows and wrote my mother a small message like “Do you see the clouds? Looks like the end of world”. She replied “Yea, pretty scary dark”. About two minutes later rain started, to be honest, it was like a rain explosion because from one second to the other a full-blown shower started.

It was not a usual shower. I don’t know how to explain this, from one second to the other I couldn’t watch…

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5 thoughts on “Today We Had A Heavy And Destructive Thunderstorm in Northern Germany

  1. Hi there, thanks for reblogging. And thanks for further related informations, I will go through your links as I find the topic interesting, your made some great points in your article too. I know about the climate cycles, I watch a lot of documentaries and don’t question the cycles of the earth weather. However, some years ago I would have questioned the climate change caused by mankind, but I am not that sure anymore about this. This is one of the topics where I can not make my own opinion.

    Just yesterday I have asked Google about the subject and found articles about climate change caused by mankind as same as articles that are sceptical and that deny the cause by mankind. I saw some great points on both sides. So, I will need to read much more about it to make my own opinion.

    However, as you said, fact is that there is climate change, which is why I mentioned that I didn’t see similar weather in my 33 years lifespan in German 😀 In two years I saw two tornados (without destruction), a big one over the Baltic Sea and a rather small wind rose over a field outside of Lübeck. Apart from that several friends or family members told me that they saw some too over the last 5 years. That is so uncommon about the weather, because we all agree that we didn’t see stuff like that in our lifespan here in Northern Germany. That is unusual as same as Tennis ball big hail that can smash car windows, tropical hot summers in Germany, extremely fast changing weather, and I could mention other things. The weather is really crazy now anyhow.

  2. Dennis thanks for your patience. Life and blogging do not always mix 😉

    I wanted to write a proper reply to you. Hope you don’t mind if I quote then reply;

    However, some years ago I would have questioned the climate change caused by mankind, but I am not that sure anymore about this. This is one of the topics where I can not make my own opinion.

    I have sort of come the opposite way. I used to live abroad so my ‘living memory’ of British events only goes back to the 80’s. What I saw, until recent years, was spring move earlier and earlier and summers get hotter and drier. The long hot, dry summers of 2003 and 2006 were phenomenal. Along with the media and what science was saying I became convinced we were to blame. I was quite gutted that some scientists were predicting the end of snow but it seemed logical because all my life I have heard about impending ecological doom and remember some scary ‘science’ books I saw as a child. During the significant winter of 2009/10 I was flabbergasted by the relentless snow and cold – which I admit have a fixation for. I started looking around at different weather forecasters/reports and started visiting sites I would normally avoid as they were by what I then called ‘deniers’. The often right wing slant also put me off however, I found some quite interesting articles but most importantly great coverage of historical events which has always been a great interest to me as I’ve seen and experienced some phenomenal weather events in my time – some of which it is only now that I realise how extreme they were including 24 hour rainfall that exceeded the whole of Winter 2014/15 – over 500mm!

    It was a slow process but it allowed me some perspective on weather history and how incredibly varied these events can be. I also started reading lots of scientific papers rather than say the reporting of it or just the abstracts. I also began reading the likes of H.H. Lamb who did great work looking at how climate changes and varies. He tended to look at climate ‘epochs’ that lasted up to fifty years.

    Just yesterday I have asked Google about the subject and found articles about climate change caused by mankind as same as articles that are sceptical and that deny the cause by mankind. I saw some great points on both sides. So, I will need to read much more about it to make my own opinion.

    I’ve highlighted the last bit as that’s by far the best way (I’ll come back to the Google search further down) What I would also say is go to a library and look at local newspapers for key events and just see how people reported it at the time. It’s fun – so little seems to change! This is a reasonable starting place as well

    http://www.xooxleanswers.com/free-newspaper-archives/newspaper-archives-europe/

    Type in say ‘tornado’ ‘giant hail’ ‘Germany’ etc. Start at the 70’s and go back. (In the 70’s they feared global cooling and a new ice age but there had been some extreme events since the early 20th Century warming stopped).

    I have often found quotes about ‘worst in living memory’ quotes being shot down by people who were alive the last time something happened. It’s why during the 2014/15 flooding in England I showed my little one what was happening as one it can be passed on. If you read about WWI you may remember the dreadful muddy trench conditions in the early part of the war – that was from some horrendous levels of rain comparable if not worse than winter 2014/15. There were even comments around then of ‘unprecedented’ warming in the Arctic.

    It’s also worth speaking to older members of the community who can remember past events or were told of what their parents lived through. I recall my late Uncle said as much to me when I was in my teens about some of the weather back in the 1960’s. He also spoke of cycles of 60 and 80 years.

    However, as you said, fact is that there is climate change, which is why I mentioned that I didn’t see similar weather in my 33 years lifespan in German 😀 In two years I saw two tornados (without destruction), a big one over the Baltic Sea and a rather small wind rose over a field outside of Lübeck. Apart from that several friends or family members told me that they saw some too over the last 5 years. That is so uncommon about the weather, because we all agree that we didn’t see stuff like that in our lifespan here in Northern Germany. That is unusual as same as Tennis ball big hail that can smash car windows, tropical hot summers in Germany, extremely fast changing weather, and I could mention other things. The weather is really crazy now anyhow.

    I agree it is crazy right now and I fear it will get much worse in the next couple of decades. Warm periods like Northern Europe experienced in the 1990’s and 2000’s have much less mixing/collision of cold and warm airmasses – it’s why for example April/May tend to be the Tornado peak in the USA as the cold dry air from the Arctic comes down over the land and meets the warm moist air from the Tropics. Geography of course counts.

    Europe has about 300 tornadoes per year[18] – much more than estimated by Alfred Wegener in his classic book Wind- und Wasserhosen in Europa (“Tornadoes and Waterspouts in Europe”). They are most common in June–August, especially in the inlands – rarest in January–March. Strong and violent tornadoes (F3–F5) do occur, especially in some of the interior areas and in the south – but are not as common as in parts of the USA. As in the USA, tornadoes are far from evenly distributed. Europe has some small “tornado alleys” – probably because of frontal collisions as in the south and east of England,[19] but also because Europe is partitioned by mountain ranges like the Alps. Parts of Styria (Steiermark) in Austria may be such a tornado alley, and this county has had at least three F3 tornadoes since 1900.[20] F3 and perhaps one F4 tornado have occurred as far north as Finland.

    Since 1900, deadly tornadoes have occurred in Belgium, France, Cyprus, Russia, Poland, Portugal (such as the F3/T7 of Castelo Branco on November 6, 1954, which killed 5 and injured 220), Wales, England, Scotland, Austria, Italy (such as the F5/T10 of Udine-Treviso on July 24, 1930, which killed 23 people,[21]) Malta, and Finland. The 1984 Ivanovo–Yaroslavl outbreak, with more than 400 fatalities and 213 injured, was the century’s deadliest tornado or outbreak in Europe. It included at least one F5 and one F4. Europe’s perhaps deadliest tornado ever (and probably one of the World’s deadliest tornadoes) hit Malta in 1551 (or 1556) and killed about 600.

    During warm climate periods the jetstream is ‘zonal’ (west to east) rises north bringing the storm tracks with them. There are less planetary waves. During cooler periods the jetstream is ‘meridional’ (wavy, north to south). This brings cold air down from the Arctic and warm air up from the Tropics. Where these converge we can have explosive weather events. They can also become ‘stuck’ meaning we can get long periods of extreme cold, extreme heat, deluges, droughts and so on. The changes can also be rapid.

    https://craigm350.wordpress.com/2014/03/18/the-great-global-weirding-of-18767/

    The 1970’s Science Mag article I linked in my reblog of your post details some of this.

    If you have the time I would recommend this to read

    http://judithcurry.com/2015/02/19/the-intermittent-little-ice-age/

    TonyB has a passion for climate and his research on the ‘Little Ice Age’ is wonderful stuff. What I would conclude from his work is that the climate back then changed and rapidly. It could be the sun. It could be the oceans. It does sounds awfully familiar. I may not have experienced such events in my lifetime…at least until recently…but my parents, grandparents, great-grandparents are another matter.

    What I would say is that I have spoken to some scientists in person. I don’t think they are bad people at all, even if I may disagree with them on Climate Change (CC). I think some are constrained by politics, money and career – something I sympathise with to a degree (he who sticks his head above the parapet gets shot). It’s often hard to speak up with so many vested interests, often at the extreme not sensible ends of the debate.

    http://www.wsj.com/articles/the-honor-of-being-mugged-by-climate-censors-1431558936

    So I am wary of Google searches – call it from seeing so may paradigm shifts in my short lifetime. Where possible I go directly to the sources, although climate papers are written in such a way as to exclude the ordinary person – a favourite trait of lawyers. I have also seen far too many events presented in such a way that if not couched in lawyer speak is nothing less than political spin.

    What the reasonable ones will say however is that CC increases the likelihood of events so that a summer like 2003 or 06 instead of e.g. happening every 50-100 years may happen 4, 5, 6 times. Floods that were once every decade can come every other year etc. What I gathered from them is that CC – or the man-made portion – is highly unlikely to be detectable now. What we are seeing is with the range of ‘natural variability’ and is therefore indistinguishable.

    Personally I do not think that run away temperatures are likely at all. Climate is so very, very complex and we are only just getting to grips with it and really able to monitor it in the satellite era – not forgetting that so many of us have mobile phones so that we can report and record these events as they happen. There are also billions more of us there to record and report these events.

    Finally I think our greatest impact on weather is changing the landscape around us. When we cut trees down, dam rivers and build on that land there are consequences we are not aware of.

    I have a post that I think sums up my beliefs now quite well and it was written when I was a child;

    https://weatheraction.wordpress.com/2015/05/07/climate-always-changes/

    Best

    Craig

    • …I mean the post contains a link to a passage from a book written when I was a child. It would be impressive if I was a child now considering I’m a father myself 😉

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