‘Snowmania’ in Zambia

h/t Argiris Diamantis

THE Zambia Meteorological Department says the recent hailstorm in some parts of Lusaka was due to a cool vertical atmosphere that did not support its melting into rain.
In a statement following Sunday’s heavy hailstorm, senior meteorological officer Victor Bupe said a cold front over the southeast coast of South Africa tilted towards the north, thereby interacting with the Congo air mass over the eastern half of Zambia.

“The fall of ice found a vertical atmosphere that could not support ice melting into rain,” said Bupe.

The Mast Online

‘Snowmania’ hits Lusaka after rare Winter Rains

Images showing some excited residents of Lusaka posing in what appears to be piles of Snow have flooded several social media platforms.

On Sunday evening, Lusaka and surrounding areas recorded heavy rains which turned a hailstorm, a rare occurrence in May.

The hailstorm saw piles of hailstones forming in several parts of the city and covered some busy streets to the amusement of some residents.

In some parts of Makeni area, residents from Children and elderly ones ran out in the chilly weather and posed for photos playing with the hailstones.

Others even started creating structures such as Snowman while others boasted that Lusaka has now started experiencing snow just like other cities in Europe and the Americas.

The hailstorm has now brought it with it low temperatures averaging 12 degrees Celsius from Monday.

The Meteorological Department last month warned that the coming Winter season will be one of the coldest ever recorded.

More pictures at Lusaka Times

Yup, the Guardian seed vault story was fear-mongering claptrap.

Ryan Maue sniffed something very wrong with the Guardian’s story. The Guardian don’t fact check when it comes to pushing their religious agenda. I wouldn’t be surprised if they publish a story that penises cause climate change.

…soaring temperatures in the Arctic at the end of the world’s hottest ever recorded yearled to melting and heavy rain, when light snow should have been falling. “It was not in our plans to think that the permafrost would not be there and that it would experience extreme weather like that,” said Hege Njaa Aschim, from the Norwegian government, which owns the vault.

[…]

The vault’s managers are now waiting to see if the extreme heat of this winter was a one-off or will be repeated or even exceeded as climate change heats the planet. The end of 2016 saw average temperatures over 7C above normal on Spitsbergen, pushing the permafrost above melting point.

“The question is whether this is just happening now, or will it escalate?” said Aschim. The Svalbard archipelago, of which Spitsbergen is part, has warmed rapidly in recent decades, according to Ketil Isaksen, from Norway’s Meteorological Institute.

“The Arctic and especially Svalbard warms up faster than the rest of the world. The climate is changing dramatically and we are all amazed at how quickly it is going,” Isaksen told Norwegian newspaper Dagbladet

It is of course total BS;

Instead we have true believers. You are not employed for your abilities but your conformity. 

Paul Homewood’s take

Finland: Is it fall, winter or spring?

Image via Finish Meteorological Institute

No need to take out the sunscreen just yet. The weather forecast for next week calls for great October weather… in May.

Southern Finland will face the beginning of the week in chilly conditions. Cold breezes from the Arctic Ocean will sweep through the country on Monday and Tuesday, which could develop into, we’re sorry to say, sleet and hail showers.

Yle meteorologist Kerttu Kotakorpi says this cold spell is in stark contrast to previous years.

”With temperatures at five degrees at best in the south, we can definitely talk about an exceptionally cold period for this time of year.”

This time last year Finland basked in sunshine and temperatures between 20 and 25 degrees.

More here

Image via AAMULEHTI

Thursday’s press review begins with an article from Aamulehti out of Tampere, asking a meteorologist for a reasonable explanation for the unreasonably cold weather Finland has had to endure this spring. Erik Saarika of the Finnish Meteorological Institute says the reason lies one kilometre above us in the atmosphere, where temperatures have been colder in April and May than they were last winter.

“Atmospheric temperatures are topsy-turvy. At this time of the year, the warmth of the sun is so abundant that it compensates for the air’s coolness, but the cold has still made itself manifest as snow, even in the afternoon. In the winter it was so warm that it rained instead,” Saarika told the paper.

This strange situation has led to it being impossible to tell what time of the year it is by looking out the window. Is it fall, winter or spring? In Tampere, the paper states, the average temperature on New Year’s Eve was 3.6 degrees Celsius, and on May 8, it was 1.7 degrees.

And even if the sun can potentially warm things back up, heavy clouds have persisted in blocking the sun in the last few months. Saarika says that many mornings have started off clear, but the skies have turned more overcast as the days have progressed, often bringing precipitation.

Sunshine statistics from the Institute show that Finland had 20 hours less sunshine in April 2017 than the 30-year average. But the weather service assures the shivering masses that things will get better: next week should see daytime temperatures of over 15 degrees Celsius in the south.

Reason for May snow

A late spring is better than an early summer – if you’re a bird…or a blueberry bush

Unseasonably cold weather is keeping birds from nesting and delaying the blossoming of wild berry bushes in Finland’s north…

There is still plenty of snow in the forests of Lapland, and there is ice on many of its lakes and rivers. Spring has inched forward slowly and temperatures, especially at night, are frigid. Right now, the weather in Lapland is 4C-5C below the long-term average.

The cold is being reflected in the late arrival of migratory birds. According to Jukka Jokimäki, a researcher at the University of Lapland’s Arctic Centre, the institution’s annual count of migratory birds is now on hold because so few have come as far north as the Arctic Circle.

“At the beginning of April it looked like we’d have an early spring, but migration has been at a standstill and is around a week and a half late. Wagtails are the only insect eaters being seen. Wading birds are missing altogether, which is understandable since all of our ponds and lakes are still covered by ice,” reports Jokimäki.

“If we consider this in a positive light, a late cold snap is unlikely to be a problem because the birds haven’t yet started nesting. It’s been winter-like all spring and, for example, game fowl haven’t been able to start nesting because there is still over 50cm of snow in the forests in the Rovaniemi area,” Jokimäki points out.

Cold temperatures have also impacted vegetation, delaying the start of the growing season. On the other hand, this may result in a more bountiful crop of wild berries come the autumn, says Rainer Peltola of the Natural Resources Institute.

“This is not a bad thing at all. The later that [berry bushes] start blooming, the less the risk of frost, and the greater the probability that the crucial phase of pollination takes place.”

YLE

Norwegians take skis out of storage after freak snowfall. Coldest night on record

It seems the late winter is still biting hard (bold added);

Norway is currently under an amount of snow extremely rare for late spring, with up to half a metre of snow falling in areas outside of Oslo.

Snowfall during Wednesday night caused traffic delay Thursday, and so much snow has fallen that Oslo residents have returned to ski slopes in the off-season, reports NRK.

Oslo’s municipality told the broadcaster that it was reopening ski slopes.

“Preparing ski slopes after Easter is completely abnormal. But we have never prepared them in May before,” Knut Johansson of the city authority said.
The Vestmarka area outside of the capital is one of the areas that has seen heavy amounts of May-time snow.

“We have 25cm at Solli in Vestmarka, where we are going out with an ATV quad bike to make ski slopes,” ski run manager Hege Blichfelt Sheriff of the local skiers’ association told NRK.

Just under a centimetre of snow was measured this morning outside the Norwegian Institute for Meteorology (Meteorologisk Institutt) at Blindern in the capital, according to NRK’s report.

Snow has not been seen at Blindern at this time of year since 1967, according to the institute.

It is something very rare for the snow to settle as far down as Blindern,” said meteorologist Terje Alsvik Walløe.

Even though snow further north is less uncommon for the time of year, Walløe said the amount that had fallen was “unusual”.

Read the rest here

Story here

Nordic power prices soared as record cold weather in parts of the region delayed the seasonal melting of snow into water needed to generate electricity.

The coldest night on record dating back to 1859 this week helped electricity prices on Wednesday jump 34 percent so far in May from a year earlier and they are headed for the highest average level for the month since 2013 on the Nord Pool AS exchange in Oslo. The unseasonably cold weather is also driving up demand for the commodity.

”It’s what we call a spring pinch,” Sigbjorn Seland, chief analyst at StormGeo’s Nena Analysis in Oslo, said by phone. ”Unusually high spot prices and very low inflows due to the cold.”

While temperatures were colder in the north in absolute terms, they fell as low as minus 7.8 Celsius (18 Fahrenheit) during the night to Thursday at Visby airport on the Island of Gotland in the Baltic Sea. It was the coldest May in the area on record. Uppsala, a town just north of Stockholm, had its coldest May night since 1947 on Wednesday.

More here

Watch “Deserts Across the World Bloom, Heavier Rains Caused by Cosmic Rays Creating More Clouds (357)”

See also;

Saudi Arabia
Chile’s Atacama Desert Blooms Pink Mallow Flowers After Spring and Summer Floods
Cold and Snow hit…Brazil!
California
China